Accoya Specified at Caernarfon Castle, Wales’ first UNESCO World Heritage Site

20.11.2023

Accoya wood decking and seating installed at Caernarfon Castle

Accoya wood decking and seating installed at Caernarfon Castle

Accoya wood decking and seating has been installed at Caernarfon Castle in Wales as part of a £5 million conservation and development project. The project has granted visitors access to areas of the medieval gatehouse at Caernarfon Castle for the first time in centuries.

Situated on the banks of the River Seiont in north west Wales, the renowned Caernarfon Castle forms part of the fabric of Welsh history and was given World Heritage Site status in 1986 – Wales’ first.

The project has seen the installation of a rooftop deck, new flooring in the gatehouse towers and the fitting of a lift that allows access to areas of the upper battlements.

Aiming to shine a light on the castle’s rich history, and also add a new contemporary layer to the story, the architectural interventions have been designed to seamlessly fit in with the castle’s aesthetics. The choice of materials was an essential consideration in this.

Buttress Architects led the project and specified Accoya wood to craft the new viewing deck and seating areas. The wood has similar tones to the castle’s original masonry and will, in time, have a weathered effect, tying in with the overall look and feel of the castle.

These new seating areas have been created to be physically separate from the castle walls. The idea is to ensure that the interventions have minimal impact on the castle’s existing structure and can be easily removed.

Lucy Ashcroft, senior architect at Buttress and lead architect on the project said: “We worked closely with Cadw, the historic environment service of the Welsh Government, who invested a huge amount of money to ensure that the castle is welcoming and accessible and continues to make a valuable contribution to the economy of the surrounding area.

“One of the greatest things about this project is that it’s not a single piece of architectural design; it’s a collection of interventions that create experiences and improves the facilities for all visitors within the King’s Gate. We’ve achieved this by ensuring our interventions slot into the castle’s story, in a contemporary way, with the castle acting as the main character.

“Choosing the right materials to carry this off was essential. We wanted to create something that would complement the existing structure, both aesthetically and functionally. Accoya is incredibly durable and requires little maintenance, so staff can focus on delivering an enjoyable guest experience, rather than worrying about maintenance work. On top of this, the colour and the weathering effect of Accoya complements the original features of the castle perfectly, while adding a modern twist.”

Justin Peckham, Head of Sales UK&I, at Accsys, added: “When we work with architects, they choose Accoya for multiple reasons from durability and stability to aesthetics – all of which were key qualities to Buttress. Its team understood the impact that this place has on the local community and was keen that every decision made reflected both its history and its future. This included material choice and by choosing Accoya, they were able to use a material that sits in harmony with the castle’s fascinating history and sense of place.”

A third of homeowners have moved or are considering moving due to development disasters

30.10.2023

Despite mortgage rates remaining high, and less applications being approved by lenders, new research reveals many homeowners are considering selling up due to developments in the area impacting their community.

The new research from Accoya reveals that even though many homeowners believe their current property is their forever home, almost a quarter (22%) have toyed with the idea of moving due to being unhappy with local construction work*. On top of this, more than one in seven (14%) respondents said that they have already moved house due to a new development in the area.

With one in three (36%) homeowners saying they have either moved or considered moving due to a new development, the research also explored the most common reasons why developments cause disturbance. The top three are that they cause an increase in road traffic, are constructed on local green space or because the design was unsympathetic to the local heritage.

Top 5 reasons why homeowners have moved, or have considered moving due to a new development:

  1. Increased the amount of traffic on the roads 37%
  2. Built on the local green space, reducing the amount of green space in the area 31%
  3. The look and feel of the development didn’t take into account the local heritage/history 28%
  4. It brought in the wrong crowds 24%
  5. The construction of the development was too loud and dirty 23%

However, almost a third (30%) of homeowners say they chose their current property based on the community spirit in the area and one in four hope to stay in their current community for the rest of their lives, despite new developments in the area.

“New developments have always been an area of contention within communities across the country. However, it’s concerning to see that so many people have considered moving because a construction project has caused issues within the local area.

“The fact that more than a quarter of homeowners have either moved, or considered moving, due to construction developments not taking the local history of an area into account is really concerning. Developers need to give greater consideration to design elements that are sympathetic to the local history and culture, not remove from it.

“Here in the UK, we have communities that are rich in heritage, are home to historical buildings and really showcase the country’s historic roots, which is why it’s so important to keep the spirit of the place in mind when planning new developments. This can be done by considering the types of products and materials which are used when constructing or restoring new buildings. A few examples of this include replicating or matching existing facades, replacing historic windows and doors with long lasting woods like Accoya rather than manmade plastics and using more natural materials, such as timber cladding that can be more sympathetic to an area’s look and feel too,” comments Gill Edwards, head of ESG at Accoya.

Accoya® selected for Penguin bridge project in Hull Aquarium

The Deep, operating as an education and conservation charity in Hull, and in recent years becoming an international player in marine conservation, has undergone development to its’ penguin enclosure with Accoya® wood.

16.07.2018

One of the most spectacular aquariums in the world

The Deep, operating as an education and conservation charity in Hull, and in recent years becoming an international player in marine conservation, has undergone development to its’ penguin enclosure with Accoya® wood, the world-leading high performance, sustainable wood product. Located in Hull, East Yorkshire it is one of the most spectacular aquariums in the world, and is home to 5,000 animals including magnificent sharks and rays, as well as penguins. The dramatic building, which overlooks the Humber estuary, was designed by world class architects, Sir Terry Farrell and Partners.

 

With opportunities to view the penguins from different areas, The Deep is the only location in the North of England where the public can see Gentoo penguins. Their home runs over three floors and features a chilled swimming pool, beach and nesting areas as well as the penguins’ very own outdoor balcony with views overlooking the Humber. The exhibit has been created with the penguins’ comfort in mind and boasts climate control and natural lighting cycles to provide essential behavioural cues for breeding and moulting.

 

Accoya® was the ideal choice for this project thanks to its exceptional durability, reliability and stability properties. Non-toxic and with a guarantee of 50 years above ground and 25 years in ground/freshwater, Accoya® wood can withstand the damp conditions within the penguin enclosure, whilst resisting distortion and warping over its lifetime.

 

25x150mm Accoya® pieces were used as decking boards, bolted to a stainless steel frame, on the entrance walkway of the enclosure. A few offcuts were also used to construct a gate and others were scattered as debris in line with the displays theme concept. All Accoya® was sandblasted to artificially weather it and accentuate the grain. The planks were left uncoated.

 

James Denman, aquarist at The Deep commented: “It was wholeheartedly agreed that Accoya® would be the best solution for a long term outcome due to its hard wearing, versatile nature. The fact that Accoya® doesn’t require treatment for longevity in a wet/dry areas definitely appealed to us. When creating an exhibit for birds, the less chemicals used the better as they are incredibly sensitive.”

RIBA – Acetylated Wood: The Optimum Solution for Cladding, Decking, Windows and Doors

20.01.2011

A RIBA-registered CPD Presentation

A RIBA-registered CPD Presentation

This CPD focuses on the topic of acetylated wood, its features, benefits, applications, sustainable credentials and the relevant specification considerations. By the end of the presentation you should a greater understanding of:

  • What acetylated wood is and acetylation
  • The benefits of acetylated wood
  • The key considerations for specifying acetylated wood
  • Common uses of acetylated wood

If you would like more information about our CPD on acetylated wood cladding, please download the information sheet below.

Download

Organise a CPD

To book now for you and your colleagues, please use our contact form here to let us know.

Someone will then be in touch to discuss further and make arrangements.

RIBA – Acetylated Wood Cladding: A Solution to Many Problems Associated with Timber

20.01.2011

A RIBA-registered CPD Presentation

A RIBA-registered CPD Presentation

Acetylated Wood: A solution to many problems associated with timber cladding.

This seminar looks at the use of acetylated wood in timber cladding. By the end of the CPD you should have a greater understanding of:

  • The causes of potential problems with timber cladding
  • The process involved with acetylated wood cladding
  • The benefits of using acetylated wood and how it can reduce cladding problems

If you would like more information about our CPD on acetylated wood cladding, please download the information sheet below.

download

Organise a CPD

To book now for you and your colleagues, please use our contact form here to let us know.

Someone will then be in touch to discuss further and make arrangements.

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