How to clean and care for your Accoya wood siding in summer

Summer is the perfect time to enjoy the outdoors, whether hiking, biking, swimming, or just being outside in the warm sun. For homeowners, summer is also the perfect time for home maintenance, including cleaning and caring for your wood siding.

08.09.2023

Get ready for summer

Get ready for summer

 

It’s not as arduous as you’d think, either. And, after you’re done, your home’s exterior is ready for the fall and beyond to perform better and keep its beautiful curb appeal.

As an Accoya customer, you know that the siding on your home is resistant to rotting, is likely to stay free of any visible distortion over its lifetime, and is a cost-effective choice for lasting performance. That’s a solid foundation for keeping your siding clean. However, dirt and debris can still accumulate over the years. Here are our six tips on how to clean wood siding and how to care for wood siding and maintain it for years to come.

Tip 1: Make sure you have the tools and supplies needed.

Tip 1: Make sure you have the tools and supplies needed.

 

Cleaning your wood siding doesn’t require specialized tools; most tools you’ll need should be in your garage. Tools and supplies include a simple garden hose with a spray nozzle, a bucket, a ladder, a soft-bristle brush or sponge, mild detergent, and if you decide to coat your siding, we have multiple options for you to consider.

Tip 2: Take a walk around your home (while enjoying that summer sunshine).

Inspect your Accoya siding and look for damaged, missing, or loose boards. Now is the time to repair any siding if needed.

Tip 3: Prep your siding and rinse.

Think of this step as painting a room. Once you’ve gathered your tools and inspected your siding, prepare your siding by removing any dirt or debris, or obstacles nearby. If you have landscaping, consider covering it with a light plastic sheet. Now it’s time to gently rinse your siding with your hose’s spray nozzle to remove dirt and any debris. (Note: never use a pressure washer for this step.

Tip 4: Scrub, clean, and rinse (again).

Fill your bucket with water with mild detergent, mix, and always test a small area to ensure your solution doesn’t damage or discolor your siding. After determining the solution is okay, gently scrub your wood siding and apply deep scrubs where dirt appears. Once your siding is cleaned, rinse it again with your garden hose.

Tip 5: Grab a beverage and allow the siding to dry.

Allow your wood siding to dry naturally with the summer sun, and enjoy your clean and maintained siding for another season.

Tip 6: To coat or not to coat

Tip 6: To coat or not to coat

 

Like other wood products, uncoated Accoya wood will weather over time to an elegant gray color when exposed to the elements outdoors. However, weathering does not affect Accoya’s durability, stability, or performance, unlike other woods.

Though your Accoya wood siding doesn’t require a recoat, you might consider recoating for aesthetic reasons. If applying a coating, let your wood siding dry for at least 24 hours, then apply your coating. For more information on coating recommendations, we have compiled a list of tried and tested coating suppliers to consider, or reference our Essential Coatings Guide for best practice tips.

Your exterior wood siding needs to weather all seasons and types of environments. Accoya knows that aesthetics, low maintenance, and durability are crucial. Accoya is a cost-effective choice siding solution for lasting performance.

Accoya siding is manufactured from FSC® certified wood and has numerous advantages: lasting performance, beautiful aesthetic, and the clear conscience that you have used a sustainable material.

Read more about Accoya wood siding products here.

10 great examples of Japanese burnt wood siding (Shou Sugi Ban)

If you’re looking for a siding material that creates a distinctive texture but one that’s also visually striking and adds a unique character to the exterior, look no further than Japanese burnt wood siding, also known as Shou Sugi Ban.

06.29.2023

 What is Shou Sugi Ban?

What is Shou Sugi Ban?

Shou Sugi Ban has been around for hundreds of years and has a long history in Japan. The technique—which includes burning the surface of the wood to create a layer of char that protects it from weathering, insects, and rot—originated in the 18th century to help preserve cedar siding on traditional Japanese homes and temples.

Shou Sugi Ban then gained popularity worldwide, with designers, architects, and homeowners using charred Accoya wood for various applications. Its durability, sustainability, and unique appearance make it a sought-after material for modern residential and commercial design projects.

Here are 10 stunning examples to inspire you if you consider installing for your Shou Sugi Ban house or other projects.

Modern touches meet sustainability

Modern touches meet sustainability

For this ultra-modern home, Shou Sugi Ban is aesthetically beautiful, and the dark finish also achieves a striking, standout appeal. Utilizing charring as a surface treatment is a natural, sustainable, non-toxic alternative to treated wood that harms people and the environment.

Beautiful and energy efficient

Beautiful and energy efficient

This Passive House in Utah is not only sustainable and energy efficient, the gorgeous exterior is wrapped in charred Accoya wood, fitting the eco-conscious theme—but is designed to last, providing stability throughout the seasonal changes in Utah.

Chicago two-tone

Chicago two-tone

This simple two-story home in Chicago used two shades of charred Accoya wood. The base is concrete, while the upper levels used an Accoya wood façade system in two different shades – grey and black. The façade mirrors the internal arrangement of the two floors. Not so simple anymore!

Swimming in design

Swimming in design

Sometimes a pool house is just a pool house, but in this case, the homeowner went deep and chose Accoya Barnwood Siding in Delta Black by Delta Millworks. The result is a modern, beautiful structure that will delight the homeowners to enjoy during the summer and show off at future pool parties.

Going coastal

Going coastal

Accoya’s MATSU (from the Japanese term ‘pine tree’), by reSAWN Timber Co., provided a burnt look on the outer facing side of the tongue and groove cladding but also extreme durability, exterior weathering capabilities, FSC®-certification, exterior warranty, and the hardiness of Accoya for those brutal coastal conditions.

Unique and Striking with Accoya

Unique and Striking with Accoya

Manufactured by reSAWN TIMBER Co., Accoya was used to bring a unique and striking look to this private residence. A specific range of Accoya wood, MATSU Shou Sugi Ban, was selected for the project. This charred cladding is burnt on the visible side only and then sealed on its face and back.

Slatted for luxury

Slatted for luxury

A deep gray, slatted Accoya wood covers the exterior, while charred, stained, sealed, and deep gray, slatted Accoya wood siding by reSAWN Timber Co. enhances the roofscape’s dynamic edges and arcs. Accoya was chosen for its durability, low maintenance, and distinctly contemporary appearance.

Not your grandfather’s garage

Not your grandfather’s garage

This striking facade for this homeowner’s garage is made from Accoya wood but was left uncoated to reveal the natural light coloring of Accoya. In complete contrast, the garage itself was clad using charred Accoya. The two varying finishes complement each other well and show just how versatile Accoya is.

Not just for homes

Not just for homes

Who says fire stations have to be drab, concrete affairs?

This fire station in Aspen used Accoya Smooth Coastline by Delta Millworks, which provides splashes and accents to break up the fire station’s exteriors.

Ready for its close up

Ready for its close up

Last is an up-close look at one of our Shou Sugi Ban—Accoya Deep Char, by Pioneer Millworks. An additional feature of Accoya’s Shou Sugi Ban wood is that the grain is emphasized much more than any other timber due to how well the process chars our wood—and is offered in various colors.

 

Whether you call it Japanese burnt wood siding or Shou Sugi Ban, you’ll be impressed by Accoya’s aesthetically pleasing looks, sustainable and long-lasting method of wood preservation, and charred layer highly resistant to moisture, UV rays, and fire.

 

An additional feature of Accoya is that our grain is emphasized much more than any other timber due to how well the process chars Accoya. The process makes it an attractive timber for exterior siding and even internal feature walls.

How To Select Low Maintenance Wood SIding For Your Home by HOUZZ

Enhance the look of your home with high-performing, modified and responsibly sourced wood siding

12.20.2021

When it comes to boosting your home’s curb appeal, great-looking siding is hard to beat. Wood is one of the most popular options, and for good reason. It adds warmth and natural appeal to your exterior and sits beautifully alongside other materials such as concrete and steel. While regular wood siding typically requires regular upkeep to maintain its appearance, acetylated wood offers an easy-care, highly durable alternative.

Read on to discover more about this siding material that’s gaining traction among architects, designers and homeowners alike.

The Natural Appeal of Wood

The Natural Appeal of Wood

There are several products on the market that re-create the look of wood siding, but none capture the warmth and natural beauty of the real thing. Vinyl wood-look siding is a low-cost option, but being a look-alike plastic product, it will never give you the truly authentic appearance or texture of genuine wood. It also has a tendency to bend or crack in cold weather if subjected to impact, and it can conceal moisture issues in your home, which can potentially lead to dangerous mold growth. Engineered wood is relatively easy to install, but it doesn’t perform as well as tropical hardwood in an exposed setting, and it can swell if exposed to water for long periods.

Accoya’s modified wood siding, which is made from quick-growing, responsibly harvested pine, is an appealing alternative. It offers the stunning good looks of tropical hardwood (including increasingly rare species) while being more sustainable and outperforming even the most durable of woods, so you can create a healthier and more eco-friendly home for your family.

“Accoya is a modified wood that aims to overcome the shortcomings of standard timber,” says Jocelyn Mahan, marketing manager at reSAWN Timber. “The modification process enhances the performance of the wood, resulting in improved longevity. Accoya is modified by a process called acetylation, a cutting-edge, patented technology that enables it to resist rot, defy the elements and stay strong for decades.”

This residence (Six Square House) in Bridgehampton, New York, features charred Accoya Ikigai wood siding, burnt in the ancient Japanese style of shou sugi ban, which gives the exterior a uniquely textured, charcoal-like appearance while enhancing its performance and minimizing upkeep.

Low Maintenance

Low Maintenance

While standard wood siding requires annual maintenance, acetylated wood does not. Accoya wood siding offers superior durability and stability, which means it can cope with the toughest climatic conditions with minimal maintenance. It won’t visibly swell, shrink or distort, even in traditionally problematic spots such as around windows.

Coated finishes not only look beautiful on Accoya, but they last longer than on other surfaces, another reason why designers and architects love it.

The beautifully weathered facade on this lakeside home in Okoboji, Iowa, was created using Accoya Nigiri shou sugi ban wood siding. It blends in seamlessly with the landscape and speaks to the current trend toward natural, sustainable design. It will require very little maintenance to maintain its stunning good looks over its lifetime.

Durability

Durability

Siding is a major, long-term investment in your home, so the material you choose needs to be able to stand up to whatever your environment throws at it — now and for decades to come. Accoya siding is resistant to rot, decay and insect damage (including termites). It’s a cost-effective choice for lasting performance. “It’s guaranteed for 50 years above ground and 25 years in ground or fresh water — its performance and properties are remarkable,” Mahan says.

Exposed to heat, humidity and rain, this waterfront home in White Stone, Virginia, is subject to more weather extremes than most, so a high-performance siding material was a must. The material also needed to create a warm, organic feel that complemented the home’s natural setting. Accoya Nigiri wood siding was chosen (alongside charred cypress) for its superior durability and earthy, coastal feel.

Environmentally Responsible

Environmentally Responsible

When you’re building or remodeling your home, you want to know that the materials you choose are good for the occupants and kind to the environment. Accoya wood is fully sustainable — it’s responsibly sourced and harvested from certified sustainable forests, with every panel having FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certification.

It’s also 100% nontoxic and contains no harmful chemicals, so you can breathe easy. The acetylation process of Accoya wood doesn’t add chemicals, which means the material is fully biodegradable at the end of its life cycle. “Accoya can be safely used, reused, recycled and incinerated,” Mahan says. “It also traps carbon for its full life cycle — it’s really sustainable.”

Accoya acetylated wood siding, windows and doors are also naturally insulating, which means they’ll help keep your home warmer in winter and cooler in summer, lowering your energy costs.

Design Freedom

Design Freedom

Siding presents a unique opportunity to get creative with the look of your exterior and wow visitors from the moment they pull up to your home. To achieve this, you’ll need a siding material that offers plenty of design flexibility.

Accoya comes in different board widths and finishes so you can easily mix up the look — and you can install them vertically, horizontally or even in patterns. It’s dimensionally stable so joints stay smooth for a tailored look. Add a colored coating, leave your Accoya wood untreated so it weathers naturally, or opt for the designer favorite seen in the home here: charred shou sugi ban. You can also combine it with other materials such as brick, steel, concrete or stone to create an eye-catching, layered look that you’ll appreciate every time you come home.

More: Learn more about Accoya’s range of long-life acetylated wood products by visiting our homepage here.

This story was written by the Houzz Sponsored Content team.

6 On Trend Details to Give your Home Exterior a Fresh Look by HOUZZ

Building a new home or updating your facade? Be inspired by these 6 ways to stylishly warm up the exterior with Accoya wood.

12.20.2021

So much attention is paid to the interiors of our homes, but the exterior is what makes the first impression. A beautifully designed facade enhances the architecture and sets the tone and feel of a home before guests even set foot inside. With its warm, natural appeal and virtually limitless design potential, wood siding has emerged as a major trend in exteriors. Here are six of-the-moment ways to use it to give your property serious street appeal.

1. Opt for a Beautifully Weathered Facade

1. Opt for a Beautifully Weathered Facade

Embrace the natural look with untreated wood siding that ages gracefully over time. It’s a wonderful way to highlight the earthy and organic beauty of the wood, and helps a home blend in with the landscape.

This stunning lakeside home in Saint Joseph, Michigan, called for a hardy wood siding that could withstand the constant wind coming off Lake Michigan. Accoya siding was chosen for its sustainability, durability and superior resistance to weather and rot. Leaving the wood untreated has allowed it to develop a stunning natural appearance that merges with the earthy, natural setting, while creating a pleasing contrast against the home’s sharp black window frames.

While standard wood siding has its benefits, it’s not suitable for every project or homeowner, as it requires ongoing maintenance and can deteriorate over time. Today you’ll find innovative alternatives that provide all the warmth and natural appeal of wood, with minimal maintenance requirements and far superior durability. Accoya’s acetylated wood siding can withstand even tough weather conditions, is resistant to rotting, and if left untreated will weather naturally to a beautiful silvery grey.

Accoya wood has impressive environmental credentials too. It’s fully sustainable, and every panel comes with FSC (Forest Stewardship Council) certification. It is also 100 percent nontoxic, so you can have peace of mind knowing it’s a healthy choice for you and your family.

2. Ditch the Trim

2. Ditch the Trim

Want the focus to be on the shape and form of your architecture rather than individual features such as your windows? Extending your wood siding right to the window ledges without including a trim, as seen on this home (Ash Tree Residence) in New Canaan, Connecticut, keeps all eyes firmly on the bigger picture while creating a sleek and modern look.

Here, Accoya siding in Old Town Gray was used to add a modern-rustic feel to the home and highlight the dramatic shape of its gable-roofed entry volume. The large picture windows are trim-free and feature minimalist frames — a clever way to maximize light and views inside the home without overshadowing the bigger architectural story from the outside.

3. Try the Shou-Sugi-Ban Trend

3. Try the Shou-Sugi-Ban Trend

If you’re looking to make a statement with a bold exterior, consider giving your home the shou-sugi-ban treatment. This ancient Japanese technique involves charring the wood to preserve and strengthen it. The charring turns the wood a deep charcoal black while revealing its texture and grain. Not only does this wood treatment make for a striking facade, but it minimizes maintenance.

4. Focus on Natural Materials

4. Focus on Natural Materials

As the saying goes, less is more. Choosing one “hero” natural material and using it in different ways across your home’s exterior can be a subtle, but very effective, way to bring cohesion to your home’s design. To create an uninterrupted sense of flow, you could carry the material through to the interior of your home or to any outbuildings.

The key to success when using a single natural material is to be creative with how you apply it. This award-winning boathouse (The Haven) in Norfolk, England, has been given light-tone Accoya wood cladding, decking and curved screening. As the property is surrounded by water on three sides, the architects selected Accoya wood for its water-resistant properties and dimensional stability, as well as its stunning natural looks and sustainability. The result is a graceful home that sits lightly in its tranquil coastal setting.

5. Play Up Textures

5. Play Up Textures

Natural appeal aside, wood cladding gives you endlessly creative ways to express your personal style. Take this three-story office building designed and occupied by architectural firm Dillon Kyle Architects in Houston, for example. It’s clad in 2,500 Accoya boards that have an abstract leaf-like pattern carved into the wood. The pattern references the oak trees that line the neighborhood, and it adds not just texture and softness to the modern structure but a unique personal touch.

“The Accoya wood boards are unsealed and allowed to weather over time,” says Peter Klein, associate principal architect at Dillon Kyle Architects. “The idea was to use a material where you couldn’t tell where the patterns started and stopped — just one big continuous object.”

As the wood siding would play a pivotal role in the look and performance of the building, the firm took their time choosing the right one. “Even left untreated, it didn’t warp or mildew or mold, and that let us know we were on the right path,” Klein says. “The neutral gray tones coupled with its long-term durability, resistance to rot and insects made Accoya wood the ideal material for this project.”

6. Go Skinny

6. Go Skinny

Add texture and depth to your home’s exterior with narrow boards for siding, louvers and screening.

For this luxury apartment block (Blackwood Street Apts) in Melbourne, Australia, the architect specified 40-by-40-millimeter Accoya wood boards with a coat of Woca Exterior Walnut Oil for the louvers and screening in the alfresco areas. The oiled boards create a soft and inviting feel while bringing a sense of intimacy to the apartment complex.

The rest of the detailing in this spot, including hardware and pavers, was deliberately pared back to keep the focus firmly on the textural wood.

Running slender boards vertically, as the architect has done here, is a clever design technique for making a low roof or ceiling appear higher. You can use this strategy both outside your home with wood siding and inside with wood wall lining.

If room height is not a concern, consider mixing vertical and horizontal patterns for added texture and interest inside or outside your home.

More: Learn more about Accoya’s range of sustainable, acetylated wood products by visiting our homepage here.

This story was written by the Houzz Sponsored Content team.

Accoya Wood Siding in Aspen

Follow Matt Risinger around Aspen, Colorado, as he visits some beautiful Accoya wood siding projects by Delta Millworks in Aspen, Colorado.

11.04.2021

Accoya Siding Projects in Aspen, Colorado

Watch the video above to travel around Aspen, Colorado, and visit some beautiful Accoya wood projects from Accoya Approved Manufacturer Delta Millworks.

Matt Risinger, host of The Build Show, tours some amazing completed projects, including Accoya siding for the Starwood Fire Station and Kiva Residence. Risinger also visits some projects still in-progress and gives you an inside look at the installation process. Accoya was chosen for its warranty and ability to perform well in ever-changing Colorado climate. Each project demonstrates different ways to finish Accoya wood for siding. Follow along as Risinger takes you on a trip that will surely spark inspiration and ideas for your next building project.

  • Kiva Residence | Aspen, CO (Video – 1:16)

The Accoya wood used in the Kiva Residence is finished with a shou-sugi-ban charred finished. Delta Millworks also labels this finish as Accoya Gator because of its unique subtle reptilian-like surface finish. This burned finish creates a thick layer of char on the surface of the board, which serves as a natural barrier to the sun.

Builder: Koru Ltd. 

Architect: Zone 4 Architects

 

  • Hotel Jerome | Aspen, CO (Video – 3:58)

Right in the heart of downtown Aspen lays this historic building. Hotel Jerome is one of the great hotels in the American West, listed on the National Register of Historic Places (1889). This project accomplished an ambitious renovation to honor this historic legacy.

Architect: Rowland Broughton

 

  • Starwood Fire Station | Starwood, CO (Video – 6:30)

This rural fire station for the Starwood community in Colorado. The pre-stained Accoya siding was chosen because of its water resistance and ability to maintain its tone and texture over time. This project was completed 3 years ago and still, the Accoya siding remains very stable and reliable in this harsh exterior environment.

Builder: GF Woods Construction

Architect: Charles Cunniffe Architects

 

  • 1940s Historic Log Cabin – House Addition  | Aspen, CO (Video – 15:38)

This historic building is adding an addition to the house. The client chose Accoya wood for the siding because of its warranty and ability to withhold the harsh weather conditions in Colorado. The tone and texture of the wood also accomplished their vision for a modern but compatible style next to this historic log cabin building. The client used a custom colored 3-coat system finish by Delta Millworks.

Builder: Okeanos Construction

Architect: Charles Cunniffe Architects (Ashley Satterfield)

 

  • Residential Home | Aspen, CO  (Video – 25:20)

This modern residential home will use uncoated Accoya wood with tongue and groove paneling for its siding. Prior to building, this Accoya wood was stored on the roof of the Delta Millwork’s building for about 6-12 months to grey out in the sun. To learn more about the installation process for this project, go to 26:17 in the video above.

Builder: Hansen Construction 

Architect: Zone 4 Architects

 

 

10 Modern Wood Siding Ideas

Options to set your home siding ideas apart from the rest.

10.07.2020

Think of it as a good-looking coat.

Think of it as a good-looking coat.

The primary purpose of your home’s exterior siding is to keep the weather out, and protect your home from wind, rain, sleet and snow, heat and cold. But protection should still be attractive; your siding can still look good whilst its benefits are working hard.

Performance criteria

Siding performance is key. No one wants to wear a raincoat that leaks, and your house is no different. Look for siding with these six qualities:

  1. Beautiful – almost goes without saying
  2. Durable – it should last for decades
  3. Easy to maintain – no one wants to spend their time repainting and staining
  4. Resistant – able to stand up to rot, decay, and insect damage
  5. Dimensionally stable –  won’t warp or twist
  6. Warranty – that will protect you for decades

It’s not easy to find a product that meets all these criteria, but one great option is Accoya. Accoya siding provides sleek, modern protection.

Accoya is one of the hottest wood siding products on the market. Made using natural wood, Accoya is FSC® certified, made from responsibly harvested wood. Accoya is also non-toxic and contains no harmful chemicals, which leaves your home feeling and looking good.

10 Modern Exterior Wood Siding Ideas Using Accoya

Home siding ideas

10 Modern Exterior Wood Siding Ideas Using Accoya

One of the beautiful things about modern architecture is that you don’t have to follow any rules.

1. Mix your siding materials

Accoya siding blends beautifully with other modern materials like concrete, stone and metal. And, because Accoya does not warp, cup or twist, your edges will always remain flat, smooth and true.

2. Go for the natural look, which has a definite modern vibe

Accoya can be left to weather naturally, leaving you with a lovely silver finish.

3. Or, use bold colors

Accoya readily accepts coatings like paint and stain. You can choose light or dark, white or black, and everything in between to coat your siding.

4. Go exotic with Shou Sugi Ban

Shou Sugi Ban is a popular trend in wood siding is really hot now, particularly for modern home designs. This traditional Japanese technique of charring wood makes it more durable and gives the siding a unique black color and burned texture for a long-lasting finish.

5. Vary the siding orientation

You can install your siding vertically, horizontally, and even in patterns – all on the same home. And, because it is natural wood, Accoya is easy to work with.

6. Mix siding styles

The exciting part is that there are no rules. You can combine traditional narrow horizontal lap siding mixed with wider vertical boards. Accoya comes in a variety of board widths, and it’s dimensionally stable, so joints stay smooth.

7. Mix textures

Most people underestimate the impact that texture can have on a home’s siding. Mix rustic, natural wood with charred boards, smooth metal panels or stucco for a signature, modern vibe.

8. Vary dimension

Another technique is to create shadows by alternating board thicknesses. You can even put some boards flat and others on edge to create interesting shadows.

9. Mix things up at the ends

This technique, used instead of corner boards, leaves a decidedly modern feel.

10. Sharpen your corners

Accoya can be fabricated to create knife edges that will perform well and stay sharp over time.

The Sky’s the Limit

The beautiful thing is that there are no rules for modern home design. Accoya gives you the flexibility to do almost anything you want with your home’s exterior. You can be creative, but then you can sit back and relax, knowing that you home will be protected for decades while still looking good.

Where to Buy

You can buy Accoya and Accoya products from our selection of distributors or manufacturers in your region. Use our map search tool to find your nearest Accoya supplier.

Find a supplier

10 Examples of amazing wood facades

07.07.2018

10 examples of outstanding wooden façades that don’t disappoint.

10 examples of outstanding wooden façades that don’t disappoint.

Most commercial structures are built using glass walls and stone or concrete façades leaving wood siding to residential building. With the improvements in CLT (cross laminated timber) it’s no surprise that there is an increase in popularity in using wood for exterior façade materials on tall wood buildings and integrating wood façades in commercial construction. Trends in residential siding include color, mixed materials, and innovative finishes like charred wood, also known as shou sugi ban, an ancient Japanese practice.

Creative, innovative or simply interesting, using durable landscape timbers for building façades creates stunning architectural showpieces. We explore 10 examples of outstanding wooden façades that don’t disappoint.

ASPEN ART MUSEUM

ASPEN ART MUSEUM

Sometimes art museums house works of art, and sometimes the museum itself is a work of art. The Aspen Art Museum, designed by Pritzker Prize-winning Japanese architect Shigeru Ban, did not disappoint onlookers when it opened in the summer of 2014. The museum’s inventive design features a woven screen made of Prodema, a wood product made of paper and resin, and the roof is composed of waves of wood.

Find out more about this project on ArchDaily.

SOUND COMMUNITY BANK

SOUND COMMUNITY BANK

Upon first glance, you might not believe this Sound Community Bank was formerly a Burger King. Maybe not on second or third glance, either. Spore Architecture worked off the existing footprint to create an upscale branch featuring custom elements like sliding wall panels and graphic wall art. The crisp, current façade is a combination of corrugated metal, composite panels, and cedar rainscreen that gives the bank a durable look that will last.

For more details of this project, visit Architizer

TASHJIAN BEE POLLINATOR CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

TASHJIAN BEE POLLINATOR CENTER, UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA

The university was interested in creating an architectural language that spoke to the idea of a farmstead but didn’t directly recreate the barn structure.“Using a modernized wood, material was a priority from a sustainability aspect,” said Chris Wingate, LEED AP and associate at MSR Design.

Accoya® wood was the ideal choice as it is the is one of the few building products to have acquired Cradle to CradleSM Certification at the elusive C2C Gold Level, and a C2C Platinum Level recognition for the most important C2C sustainable category; Material Health. All of the exterior siding is Accoya® wood, both charred and stained. The charred Accoya® wood was completed by Delta Millworks based in Austin, Texas.

Discover more about this project here.

YOGA STUDIO BY MODERN OFFICE OF ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

YOGA STUDIO BY MODERN OFFICE OF ARCHITECTURE & DESIGN

Imagine attending a yoga class that begins before you even walk in the building. That’s what the Modern Office of Architecture + Design set out to achieve when they were tasked with converting an old office building into a yoga and Pilates studio. The flowing waves of the topographic appearance of the screen are actually 100-year-old reclaimed fir meant to replicate the movement of bodies inside the studio. The best part? The unique layout of the façade allows for different perspectives of its waves based on your location in or out of the building.

Find out more about this project via Architect Magazine.

OREGON BACH FESTIVAL BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

OREGON BACH FESTIVAL BUILDING, UNIVERSITY OF OREGON

The Oregon Bach Festival was granted its own building at the University of Oregon for the first time in history. The building, Berwick Hall, is filled with rehearsal, recital, and lecture facilities and is located near the School of Music and Dance. Accoya® wood was chosen for the siding as it blended in with the other materials in the building and the surrounding neighborhood and the Accoya® requires significantly less maintenance than other wood siding.

THE CENTER OF WELLBEING

THE CENTER OF WELLBEING

The Center for Wellbeing in Edinburgh needed a façade that lived up to its name. That’s where timber siding came in. To create the right look for the Thistle Foundation, an organization that aids individuals in need of emotional support, they turned to 3DReid to fashion an exterior that was as warm and friendly on the outside as the folks are on the inside.

Discover more via ArchDaily.

SQUIRREL HILL PASSIVE HOUSE DUPLEX, PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

SQUIRREL HILL PASSIVE HOUSE DUPLEX, PITTSBURGH, PENNSYLVANIA

Three coats of permeating and sealing stains are on the Accoya® wood siding of this duplex in Pittsburgh’s upscale Squirrel Hill community. The hands-on homeowner was impressed with both the feature of the shiplap-patterned outer walls and Accoya® wood’s durability, 50-year guarantee above ground and low carbon footprint. This was an important element in the ultra-energy efficient duplex achieving a passive house certification – the first in the area.

Read more here.

LANGLEY ACADEMY

LANGLEY ACADEMY

Langley Academy in South East England aspires to elevate academic standards through re imagining the entire school experience, so when it was time for a new building, they knew it needed to match their vision. The new design is perfectly curated to work in tandem with the school’s innovative curriculum, and the exterior wood siding is sourced from sustainable timber.

For full project details, read more from Foster + Partners.

MODERN HOME USING ACCOYA® CHARRED WOOD BY RESAWN, NEW YORK

MODERN HOME USING ACCOYA® CHARRED WOOD BY RESAWN, NEW YORK

Manufactured by reSAWN TIMBER, Accoya® was chosen from the MATSU shou sugi ban charred collection to clad a project in Bellport, New York. Designed by Studio DB, the Accoya® was burnt on the outer facing side of the tongue and groove siding and specified because of its extreme durability, exterior weathering capabilities and exterior warranty.

Charred using the ancient Japanese technique of shou sugi ban, MATSU is finished without brushing off the soft charcoal layer. This charcoal layer is a sacrificial wear layer that will flake slowly (as is expected for any natural building product) over time to reveal a blackened effect underneath with variations in colour from grey to brown tones – perfect for this heavily wooden landscape.

Charred Accoya® selected for private residence in Bellport, New York

Where to Buy

You can buy Accoya and Accoya products from our selection of distributors or manufacturers in your region. Use our map search tool to find your nearest Accoya supplier.

Find a supplier
× Where to buy Map view List view

Go back

WHERE TO BUY ACCOYA

for your next project
Go back

FIND A SUPPLIER

for your next project
Enter your zip code/location:
loading
Geo Location Symbol

Are you looking for a stockist in ?

loading
Close

You are currently on the Accoya site

Would you like to visit the Accoya Site to view all relevant content for your location?

Yes take me to the site

No thanks, stay on site